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Tararua Tramping Club

Te rōpū hikoi o te pae maunga o Tararua   -   Celebrating 100 years of tramping

Tararua History Eastern Hutt Place Name Origins

Compiled by Jeremy Foster -> mailto:jjfoster [snail] xtra [period] co [period] nz, January 2020.

Revised: 11 March 2024.

The document is laid out in the following style:

Locality Name for example – Arabella Rock.
Type of geographical feature for example – Geographic Feature.
Definition for example – A sailing ship Arabella struck the rock in 1861. It is a Latin word meaning beautiful altar. It is located in Fitzroy Bay.
Source of the information for example – Map.
Meaning of the information for example – Internet Dictionary.
Time frame when the name came into existence for example – 1900s.

This document is about the origin of the names of various topographical features, tracks, huts and other sites of the eastern side of the Hutt Valley / Te Awa Kairangi. It excludes road and street names.

Hutt Valley is named after William Hutt (1801 – 1882) who was a founding member, director and chairman of the New Zealand Company. He was also a member of parliament in England.

Te Awa Kairangi means river full of good food. Te means the. Awa means river. Kai means food. Rangi means good.

The area for the purposes of this document covers is from Stokes Valley to the Baring Head / Ōrua-Pouanui area. It is the eastern side of the Hutt Valley / Te Awa Kairangi and Wellington Harbour to the start of the watershed of Wainuiomata. It excludes the following:

  • Place names from Burdans Gate to Stokes Valley including bays, suburbs and headlands.
  • Rocks and Tracks in the Baring Head / Ōrua-Pouanui Park.
  • Tracks in the Haywards Eastern Hills Scenic Reserve.
  • Tracks in the Waiū Street Mountain Bike Park in Wainuiomata and that also extend to the Hutt Valley / Te Awa Kairangi.

Other documents that relate to the area are:

  • For information on the topographical features, tracks, huts and other sites of Wainuiomata, that is the watershed from the head of the Wainuiomata River to the mouth where it enters the sea at the Wainuiomata Coast and its tributaries, see Wainuiomata Place Name Origins.

For more history about the Maori naming and their association with the Hutt Valley / Te Awa Kairangi see the book called The Great Harbour of Tara by G. Leslie Adkin.

The Map sources are from various topographical maps as stated in the Bibliography.

See the Bibliography for further sources of information.

Adams Hill High Point
Joseph Tyndall Adams (1842 – 1912) was a master mariner but later in the 19th century he settled in Taitā, Hutt Valley. It is a high point on the ridge between the Taitā, Hutt Valley and Stokes Valley.

Source – Map. Information – Electoral Roll. Time Frame – 1910s.

Arabella Rock Geographic Feature
A sailing ship Arabella struck the rock in 1861. It is a Latin word meaning beautiful altar. It is located in Fitzroy Bay.

Source – Map. Information – Internet Dictionary. Time Frame – 1900s.

Baring Head / Ōrua-Pounui Park Park / Reserve
Baring Head is named after Francis Baring (1800 – 1868) who was a supporter of the New Zealand Company. He was also a member of parliament in England and a banker.

Ōrua-Pounui is officially translated of the place of the den or retreat of Pouanui. O means of. Rua means place. Pouanui is a name of a person. It can also mean pit of great posts. O means of. Rua means pit. Poua means posts. Nui means great.

The Greater Wellington Regional Council owns the park and the area covered is about 295 hectares. They have owned the park since 2011. There is a light house and related structures located at Baring Head / Ōrua–Pouanui. It is part of the East Harbour Regional Park. The main entrance is from about 1460 Coast Road. Other entrances are from Fitzroy Bay and the Wainuiomata Coast.

Source – Map. Information – Wikipedia. Time Frame – 2011.

Big Gully Bay Geographic Feature
Geographical term in that the area is large. It is also known as Pipes Bay.

Source – Map. Information – The Pencarrow Walk – Eastbourne to Kohangatera compiled and published by the East Harbour Environmental Association. Time Frame – 1950s.

Bluff Point Headland
Geographical term in that it is a broad rounded cliff. There is a waste water outlet with related structures located in the area. There is also the remains of shingle extraction structures that took place in the area from the 1900s to 1930s.

Source – Map. Information – Internet Dictionary. Time Frame – 1840s.

Bridle Track High Point
It is a path or trail or thoroughfare that is used by people riding on horses. This was a track located between Stokes Valley and Whitemans Valley that was built in the 1860s and maintained until the 1950s. The track started at 17 Horoeka Street, Stokes Valley at went to the intersection of Whitemans Valley Road, Blue Mountains Road and Johnsons Road, Whitemans Valley. The lower part of the track is still partially there in Stokes Valley and is now known as the Horoeka Street Track.

Source – Map. Information – Internet Search. Time Frame – 1910s.

Bucks, Mt High Point
George Green Bucks (1818 – 1894) was a 19th century settler at Taitā, Hutt Valley. It is a high point on the ridge between Taitā, Hutt Valley and Stokes Valley.

Source – Map. Information – Electoral Roll. Time Frame – 1840s.

Burdans Gate Feature
George Grove Burdan (1876 – 1938) was a farmer in Gollans Valley. It is a name of house that was built in 1928 and is located at 521 Muritai Road, Eastbourne. He owned the land south from this location. His son Edgar Richard Burdan (1900 – 1974) who was later known as Cecil Richard Burdan, was also a farmer in Gollans Valley, lived in the house.

Source – Map. Information – Internet Search. Time Frame – 1910s.

Bus Barn Track Track
Where buses are turn around and are stored. It is also known as the Korohiwa Track. The track starts from 495 Muritai Road and goes to the top of the Kōwhai Street Track on the ridge between Eastbourne and Butterfly Creek.

Source – Map. Information – Internet Search. Time Frame – 1930s.

Butterfly Creek Water
A view showing a carpet of thick, dark green bush covering many acres, and set in the midst of lighter green shape of a perfectly formed butterfly. It could be seen from the top of the Matipo Street Track from the 1920s to 1951 when looking down into the valley. After 1951 it gradually lessened due to either bush fires or bush clearance.

Source – Map. Information – Butterfly Creek – A Visitors Guide To The Forests Between Eastbourne And Wainuiomata by Eastbourne Forest Rangers. Time Frame – 1900s.

Camac Hut, Gollans Valley Hut
An amalgamation of two peoples first name and surname, that is Cameron William Grant Jelley (1911 – 1979) and Percival David Anthony McCrae (1913 – 1982). The hut was in existence from the 1920s to 1963. It was located on private land in the northern area of Gollans Valley.

Source – Newspaper Article. Information – Electoral Roll. Time Frame – 1920s.

Cameron Creek Water
Cameron, Mt High Point
Cameron Ridge Track Track
John Cameron (1823 – 1888) was a 19th century settler in the Gollans Valley area. The family farmed in the area from the 1840s to 1914.

Mt Cameron was previously known as Rhodes Hill. There was a World War 2 (1939 – 1945) Lookout Post located at Mt Cameron.

Cameron Ridge Track is a former farm track. It starts from the mouth of Lake Kohangatera and climbs the ridge between this lake and Lake Kohangapiripiri.

Cameron Stream is also known as Waimikomiko Stream.

Source – Map. Information – The Land Barons Of Wainuiomata by Gavin Wallace. Time Frame – 1840s.

Camp Bay Geographic Feature
People from Eastbourne would rent their baches or houses and spend the summer months camped in this bay in the early 20th Century. To a lesser extent it is also known as Stingray Bay, which is named after a large, flat, round fish that has a long tail.

Source – Map. Information – The Pencarrow Walk – Eastbourne to Kohangatera compiled and published by the East Harbour Environmental Association. Time Frame – 1900s.

Cheviot Road Track Track
Cheviot Wellington Rangi Dillion Bell (1892 – 1960) was a son of Francis Henry Dillon Bell (1851 – 1936) who owned land in Lowry Bay, Eastbourne. The track starts from 67 Cheviot Road and goes to the Howard Road Track.

Source – Map. Information – Valley And Bays – Origins Of Street Names In Lower Hutt, including Eastbourne, Petone and Wainuiomata by Alison Carey and Wikipedia. Time Frame – 1930s.

Coolag Hut, Gollans Valley Hut
The origin of this name is not known. It is however known that it was named after 2 people whose surname started with Coo and Lag. The hut was in existence from the 1920s to 1963. It was located on private land in the northern area of Gollans Valley.

Source – Newspaper Article. Information – ?? Time Frame – 1920s.

CW Jelleys Hut, Gollans Valley Hut
Cameron William Grant Jelley (1911 – 1979) was a tramper in the Wainuiomata and Ōrongorongo areas from the 1930s. The hut was in existence from the 1930s to 1963. It was located on private land in the northern area of Gollans Valley area near Butterfly Creek.

Source – A Chronology Of The Tararua And Rimutaka Ranges – 6th Edition by Ross Kerr. Information – Electoral Roll. Time Frame – 1930s.

Delaney Reservoir Track Track
Thomas Patrick Delaney (1871 – 1955) was a 20th century farmer in Stokes Valley. The track is on a partially constructed road that was not completed. The water reservoir was built in 1964. The track starts from next to 73 Delaney Drive and goes to the Reservoir in which the main access is from 12 Shaftesbury Grove.

Source – Map. Information – Valley And Bays – Origins Of Street Names In Lower Hutt, including Eastbourne, Petone and Wainuiomata by Alison Carey. Time Frame – 1950s.

Dillion Street Track Track
Francis Henry Dillon Bell (1851 – 1936) owned land in Lowry Bay, Eastbourne. He was a lawyer, mayor, member of parliament and prime minister of New Zealand. Also on this track is the brick foundations of the house of James Jackson (1811 – 1846) and his wife Emma Jackson nee Ogden (1813 – 1888). The tracks starts from 1 Dillon Street and goes to opposite 28 Ngaumatau Road.

Source – Map. Information – Valley And Bays – Origins Of Street Names In Lower Hutt, including Eastbourne, Petone and Wainuiomata by Alison Carey and Wikipedia. Time Frame – 1930s.

dyett.jpeg: 494x347, 67k (2020 Jul 30 08:27)
Dyett
from NZMS Hutt N160 4th Edition 1977(approve sites)

Dyett, Mt High Point
Constance Gwendoline (Gwen) Thomson later Dyett (1901 – 1985) was a daughter of Spensley Dixon Thomson (1864 – 1936) of Kamahi Farm in Stokes Valley. Also Gwens husband Gordon Allan Dyett (1904 – 1983) brother - Henry Lewis Percy Dyett (1889 – 1975) was a surveyor who was involved in the subdividing of farms into housing in Stokes Valley. Percy was also associated with Karori, Wellington.

Source – Map. Information – Internet Search. Time Frame – 1950s.

East Harbour Regional Park Park / Reserve
Geographical term in that the area is on the east side of the harbour. It covers the area from the Wainuiomata Hill Road to Burdans Gate in Eastbourne. It incorporates the Francis Bell Reserve, Plantation Reserve and the Eastbourne Domain Recreation Reserve. The Greater Wellington Regional Council owns the park and the area covered is about 1,620 hectares.

Source – Map. Information – Internet Dictionary. Time Frame – 1980s.

Eastbourne Domain Recreation Reserve Park / Reserve
It is named after the England town of Eastbourne. The reserve covered the area south of Mt Hawtrey covering Butterfly Creek and Upper Gollans Valley to Burdans Gate vicinity. It is now part of the East Harbour Regional Park.

Source – Map. Information – Internet Search. Time Frame – 1920s.

Ferry Road Track Track
A ferry service started in the 1890s between Eastbourne and Wellington that conveyed passengers and goods. It was also known as the Days Bay Track, which is named after George Day (1797 – 1880) who leased land in the area in the 1840s. The track starts from next to 66 Ferry Road and goes to the Main Ridge Track between Eastbourne and Gollans Stream.

Source – Map. Information – Valley And Bays – Origins Of Street Names In Lower Hutt, including Eastbourne, Petone and Wainuiomata by Alison Carey. Time Frame – 1930s.

Finger Hill High Point
Geographical term in that it looks like a finger.

Source – Map. Information – Internet Dictionary. Time Frame – 1880s.

Fitzroy Bay Water
Robert Fitzroy (1805 – 1865) was a Governor General of New Zealand from 1843 to 1845. He was also captain on the ship Beagle with Charles Robert Darwin (1809 – 1882) who came up with a theory of evolution.

Source – Map. Information – Wikipedia. Time Frame – 1840s.

Francis Bell Grove Track Track
Francis Bell Reserve Park / Reserve
Francis Henry Dillon Bell (1851 – 1936) owned land in Lowry Bay, Eastbourne. He was a lawyer, mayor, member of parliament and prime minister of New Zealand.

The Francis Bell Reserve covered the area south of the Wainuiomata Hill Road to north of Mt Lowry in the Lowry Bay vicinity. It is now part of the East Harbour Regional Park.

Francis Bell Grove Track was also known as Lowry Bay Track. The track was in existence from the 1950s to the 1990s. It is still there in the 2020s but no maintenance has been done as the track is on private property. It started from next to 11 Francis Bell Grove and went to the Main Ridge Track between Eastbourne and Wainuiomata.

Source – Map. Information – Valley And Bays – Origins Of Street Names In Lower Hutt, including Eastbourne, Petone and Wainuiomata by Alison Carey and Wikipedia. Time Frame – 1880s.

Golders Valley Gully / Valley
William Golder (1810 – 1876) was a 19th century settler in the Hutt Valley. He was also a poet, school master and bush clearer. It is located in the Gollans Valley area.

Source – Map. Information – Electoral Roll. Time Frame – 1880s.

Goldmans Creek Water
The mineral gold was discovered in the area in late 1870s. The man suffix comes from the fact that it is humans that finds and extracts the gold from the source. It is located in the Gollans Valley area.

Source – Map. Information – Papers Past. Time Frame – 1880s.

Gollans Stream Water
Gollans Valley Gully / Valley
Gollans Valley Road Track
Donald Matheson Gollan (1811 – 1887) was a New Zealand Company official in the 1840s. Gollans Valley Road was constructed in the 1840s. It starts from the Burdans Gate area and goes over the ridge and follows the valley floor southwards. At one time the road went to the mouth of Lake Kohangatera but it now stops before the wetland area. It is a private road owned by the landowners.

Source – Map. Information – Eastbourne: A History Of The Eastern Bays by Ann Beaglehole. Time Frame – 1840s.

Great Harbour Way, The Road / Track
A road / track around the harbour of Wellington. Wellington Harbour is also known as Te Whanganui a Tara / Great Harbour of Tara. Te means the. Whanga means harbour. Nui means big. A means of. Tara is a personal name and is a son of the Polynesian explorer Whatonga who settled in the Hawkes Bay area. It is also known as the Pencarrow Coast Road / Te Aranui O Pōneke. It is a private road owned by the Hutt City Council.

Source – Map. Information – Internet Search. Time Frame – 2010s.

Hanify, Mt High Point
Hugo James Haren Page Hanify (1865 – 1945) was a civil engineer and surveyor who resided in Wellington. He laid out all the streets and surveyed the whole of the Point Howard suburb. It is located on a high point on the Howard Road Track.

Source – Map. Information – Internet Search. Time Frame – 1920s.

Hawtrey, Mt High Point
Hawtrey Track Track
Montague John Greg Hawtrey (1805 – 1886) was of Trinity College, Cambridge, England. He was a friend and supporter of Edward Gibbon Wakefield (1796 – 1862) who was involved in the European settlement of New Zealand. Pre 1900 it was also known as Hawtry which is a alternative spelling of Hawtrey.

The Hawtrey Track starts from the intersection of Kererū Track and Main Ridge Track and goes to the MacKenzie Track. The track has its origins in that it was also a Māori Track.

Source – Map. Information – Eastbourne: A History Of The Eastern Bays by Ann Beaglehole. Time Frame – 1840s.

Haywards Eastern Hills Scenic Reserve Park / Reserve
Harry Miles Hayward (1857 – 1953) was a 19th century settler who resided in Whites Lines East, Hutt Valley. The Hutt City Council owns the reserve and the area covered is about 122 hectares.

Source – Map. Information – Electoral Roll. Time Frame – 1880s.

Hinds Point Headland
Samuel Hinds (1793 – 1872) was a avid Christianity clerical (religious) supporter of the New Zealand Company who resided in England. It is also known as Quarry Bluff / Point.

Source – Map. Information – The Pencarrow Walk – Eastbourne to Kohangatera compiled and published by the East Harbour Environmental Association and Wikipedia. Time Frame – 1840s.

Hornes Ridge Ridge
Robert Leatham Horn (1866 – 1945) was a farmer in Gollans Valley and supplied Eastbourne with milk until about 1917.

Source – Map. Information – Eastbourne: A History Of The Eastern Bays by Ann Beaglehole. Time Frame – 1900s.

Horoeka Scenic Reserve Park / Reserve
Horoeka Street Track Track
A native tree that has foliage that changes from long and thin when young to wider and more rounded as the tree matures. It is also known as the lancewood.

The Horoeka Scenic Reserve was established in 2011. Prior to this it was private land. The Hutt City Council owns the reserve and the area covered is about 23 hectares.

The Horoeka Street Track starts from 17 Horoeka Street and goes to the Kingsley Street Track on the ridge between Stokes Valley and the Silverstream Landfill. Horoeka Street Track incorporates part of a track between Stokes Valley and Whitemans Valley that was built in the 1860s and was known as the Bridle Track.

Source – Map, Hutt City Track and Trails. Information – Māori Dictionary. Time Frame – 1860s.

Howard Road Track Track
Howard Road Lookout Track Track
Philip Henry Howard (1801 – 1883) was a Member of Parliament in the country of England and a committee member of the New Zealand Association. Point Howard is also known as Ngaumatau. The track was one of the early tracks into Wainuiomata prior to the Wainuiomata Hill Road being built in the late 1850s. There are 2 water reservoirs known as Point Howard Reservoirs that were built in 1932 and 1965 that are located at the start of the track. The track has its origins in that it was also a Māori Track.

Howard Road Track starts from 87 Howard Road and goes to the Main Ridge Track between Eastbourne and Wainuiomata.

Howard Road Lookout Track starts from just west of where it meets the Main Ridge Track between Eastbourne and Wainuiomata and goes to a lookout area.

Source – Map. Information – Valley And Bays – Origins Of Street Names In Lower Hutt, including Eastbourne, Petone and Wainuiomata by Alison Carey and Wikipedia. Time Frame – 1840s.

Inconstant Point Headland
A sailing ship called the Inconstant came ashore here in 1848 but was later refloated.

Source – Map. Information – The Pencarrow Walk – Eastbourne to Kohangatera compiled and published by the East Harbour Environmental Association. Time Frame – 1840s.

Judd Crescent Firebreak Track Track
William Judd (1798 – 1876) was a 19th century settler firstly in Waiwhetū and later in Stokes Valley, Hutt Valley. The track starts from between 101 and 111 Judd Crescent, Naenae and goes to the Summit Road Firebreak Track on the ridge between Naenae and Fairfield, Hutt Valley. The firebreak became partly overgrown from 2015.

Source – Map. Information – Valley And Bays – Origins Of Street Names In Lower Hutt, including Eastbourne, Petone and Wainuiomata by Alison Carey. Time Frame – 1960s.

Kāeaea Track Track
A shortened version of Kārearea the native Falconthat has broad wings, long tail, long yellow legs and toes, yellow eye ring, dark eyes and a distinct moustache strip from the base of the strongly hooked bill down the face. The track starts from between 261 and 263 Muritai Road and goes to the Mackenzie Road Track on the ridge between Eastbourne and Butterfly Creek.

Source – Map, Hutt City Tracks and Trails. Information – Māori Dictionary. Time Frame – 2018.

Kaitawa Road Track Track
The food of the tawa tree. Kai means food. Tawa is a native tree that has damson like fruit. It is also known as the York Bay Track, which is named after John Eric Crowther (1831 -1911) and Frederick Kershaw Crowther (1833 – 1907) who were from Yorkshire, England. They owned land in this area. Their sisters and parents later joined them there in York Bay before selling and moving to Wainuiomata and elsewhere. The track starts from 23 Kaitawa Road and goes to the Main Ridge Track between Eastbourne and Gollans Stream.

Source – Map. Information – Valley And Bays – Origins Of Street Names In Lower Hutt, including Eastbourne, Petone and Wainuiomata by Alison Carey. Time Frame – 1930s.

Kākāriki Access Track Track
A small native parakeet bird of which there are 3 species. They all have a predominantly green plumage. Kākā means parrot. Riki means small. The track starts from 200 Kākāriki Way in Whitemans Valley and goes to the ECNZ (Electricity Corporation of New Zealand) Power Pylon Road overlooking the head of Moores Valley. There is a private residence at the top of Moores Valley on the ridge.

Source – Map, Hutt City Tracks and Trails. Information – Māori Dictionary. Time Frame – 2000s.

Kāmahi Street Track Track
Kāmahi is a tall native tree (Weinmannia racemosa) that has small cream–coloured flowers and dark timber. It was originally a farm track. It was also known as Green Track, which is named after that the colour of the bush is green. There was a water intake located in the area north of where the street ends. The track starts from 126 Kāmahi Street and goes to the ridge between Stokes Valley and Whitemans Valley.

Source – Map, Hutt City Tracks and Trails. Information – Māori Dictionary. Time Frame – 1970s.

Kelly, Mt High Point
Richard Kelly (1810 – 1888) was a 19th century settler in Gollans Valley. It is a high point in the Gollans Valley area.

Source – Map. Information – Eastbourne: A History Of The Eastern Bays by Ann Beaglehole. Time Frame – 1870s.

Kererū Track (Eastbourne) Track
A native pigeon (Hemiphaga novaeseelandiae) that has mainly greenish metallic plumage with white underparts and a purplish crimson bill and feet. There was a water intake located in the area north of where the streets ends. The track starts from next to 16 Kererū Road and goes to the Main Ridge Track between Eastbourne and Gollans Stream.

Source – Map. Information – Māori Dictionary. Time Frame – 1930s.

Kererū Track (Haywards Eastern Hills Scenic Reserve) Track
A native pigeon (Hemiphaga novaeseelandiae) that has mainly greenish metallic plumage with white underparts and a purplish crimson bill and feet. The track is a former firebreak. The track starts about halfway along Morepork Track and goes to Mt Tōwai.

Source – Map. Information – Māori Dictionary. Time Frame – 1970s.

Kingsley Street Track Track
The kings wood / meadow which refers to the trees located in the area. There are water reservoirs known as Kingsley Reservoirs at the start of the track and these were built in 1955. The track is a former firebreak. The track starts from 95 Kingsley Street and follows the ridge between Stokes Valley and the Silverstream Landfill.

Source – Map, Hutt City Tracks and Trails. Information – Internet Search. Time Frame – 1970s.

Knights Hill High Point
Charles Prendergast Knight (1871 – 1966) was a land owner in the Whitemans Valley and Stokes Valley area. He resided in Wellington. It is a high point between Stokes Valley and the Silverstream Landfill.

Source – Map. Information – Electoral Roll. Time Frame – 1910s.

Kohangapiripiri, Lake Water
Kohangapiripiri Track Track
A strongly clinging nest on account of the area being very wind swept. Kohanga means nest. Piripiri means cling.

Lake Kohangapiripiri Track is a former farm track. It starts from the mouth of Lake Kohangapiripiri and goes around the lake to other side of the mouth of the lake.

Source – Map. Information – The Great Harbour Of Tara by G. Leslie Adkin and Wikipedia. Time Frame – 1800s.

Kohangatera, Lake Water
Kohangatera Track Track
A nest basking in the sun – a sheltered place with food aplenty. Kohanga means nest. Tera means basking in the sun. In the 19th century for the Europeans it was known as Sweetwater Lagoon, which is named as the lake was fresh water in that was not contaminated by sea water and salt spray from the sea.

Lake Kohangatera Track is a former farm track. It starts from the mouth of Lake Kohangatera and goes around the lake to the other side.

Source – Map. Information – The Great Harbour Of Tara by G. Leslie Adkin and Wikipedia. Time Frame – 1800s.

Kōrau Recreation Reserve Park / Reserve
A large tree fern (Cyathea medullaris) which has a crown of pinnated fronds with whitish undersides. The Hutt City Council owns the reserve and the area covered is about 15.1 hectares.

Source – Map. Information – Māori Dictionary. Time Frame – 1950s.

Korimako Circular / Loop Track Track
Korimako Track Track
A native olive green songbird (Anthornis melanura) that has a short curved bill and dark bluish–black wings known for its loud, clear, liquid songs. It is also known as the bellbird.

The Korimako Circular / Loop Track starts from behind 611 Marine Drive, that is Williams Park and goes to 16 Korimako Road.

The Korimako Track starts from next to 23 Korimako Road and goes to the Main Ridge Track between Eastbourne and Gollans Stream.

Source – Map. Information – Māori Dictionary. Time Frame – 1930s.

Korohiwa Track Track
A dawn chorus from the birds that used to be in the area. A Māori settlement used to be on the shoreline. It also means pink pāua from the shellfish on the shoreline. It is also known as the Bus Barn Track. The track starts from 495 Muritai Road and goes to the top of the Kōwhai Street Track, on the ridge between Eastbourne and Butterfly Creek.

Source – Map. Information – Māori Dictionary. Time Frame – 1930s.

Kōtuku Kawau Rock Geographic Feature
A native white and black cormorant / shag bird species. Kōtuku means white cormorant / shag. Kawau means black cormorant / shag. It is also known as Shag Rock.

Source – Map, Greater Wellington Regional Council. Information – Māori Dictionary. Time Frame – 1800s.

Kōwhai Street Track Track
Kōwhai is a native tree that grows to around 8 metres high and have fairly smooth bark with small leaves. It produces yellow flowers. The track starts from 33 Kōwhai Street and goes to Butterfly Creek.

Source – Map. Information – Māori Dictionary. Time Frame – 1930s.

Lakes Block Circuit Track Track
It goes around Parangarahu / Pencarrow Lakes in a circular direction. It is a former farm track. The track starts from the mouth of Lake Kohangatera and goes around the lake.

Source – Map, Greater Wellington Regional Council. Information – Internet Search. Time Frame – 2000s.

Lees Creek Water
Henry (Harry) Lee (1865 – 1937) was a farmer at 1500 Coast Road, Wainuiomata. His land holdings extended to Fitzroy Bay. It is in the Fitzroy Bay area.

Source – Map. Information – Electoral Roll. Time Frame – 1900s.

Leightons Gully Track Track
Herbert Ernest Leighton (1869 – 1945) was a auctioneer and land agent. He lived on the south side of Whites Line, Hutt Valley. He was also a Lower Hutt Borough Councillor (1903 – 1905). It was originally a wide benched track used by horse traffic. The track was one of the early tracks into Wainuiomata prior to the Wainuiomata Hill Road being built in the late 1850s. The track name prior to Henry Ernest Leighton owning land in the area is not known. There are remnants from when the area was farmed such as fences, water troughs and farm tracks alongside the track in the lower part. It is also known as Morepork Track. The track starts from the Griffins Ridge Track and goes to the ECNZ Power Pylon Track on the ridge between the Hutt Valley and Wainuiomata. Also there is access from one of the gullys on the Lower Hutt side of the Wainuiomata Hill Road going up.

Source – Map, Friends of the Waiwhetu Haywards Scenic Reserve. Information – Friends Of The Waiwhetu Haywards Scenic Reserve. Time Frame – 1840s.

Lighthouse Track Track
A tower or other structure containing a beacon light to warn or guide ships at sea. Pencarrow Lighthouse was constructed in 1859. However a light existed at this point from the 1840s. The track starts from near the Pencarrow Lighthouse along the Pencarrow Coast Road and goes to the Lighthouse. The track also goes to the west side of the mouth of Lake Kohangapiripiri. The track has its origins in that it was also a Māori Track as it was used to bypass Pencarrow Head / Te Rae–Akiaki.

Source – Map. Information – Internet Search. Time Frame – 1850s.

Link Ridge Ridge
Geographical term in that it is linking two points. It is located between Valley View Hill and Mt Sugarloaf.

Source – Map. Information – Internet Dictionary. Time Frame – 1900s.

Lions Rock Geographical Feature
A large tawny-coloured cat that lives in prides.

Source – Map. Information – Internet Dictionary. Time Frame – 1900s.

Lowry Bay Track Track
Richard Jennings Lowry (1816 – 1840) was a First Mate on the Tory, the New Zealand Company Survey Ship, which anchored in Wellington Harbour in 1839. It is also known as Francis Bell Grove Track. The track was in existence from the 1950s to the 1990s. It is still there in the 2020s but no maintenance has been done as the track is on private property. The track started from next to 11 Francis Bell Grove and went to the Main Ridge Track between Eastbourne and Wainuiomata.

Source – Map. Information – Eastbourne: A History Of The Eastern Bays by Ann Beaglehole. Time Frame – 1840s.

MacKenzie Track Track
Francis Andrew Wallace MacKenzie (1824 – 1892) was a Independent party Member of Parliament who represented the Otago electorate from 1881 to 1884. He was also a farmer. He owned land in this area of Eastbourne. The track starts from next to 1 MacKenzie Road and goes to the ridge between Eastbourne and Butterfly Creek.

Source – Map. Information – Valley And Bays – Origins Of Street Names In Lower Hutt, including Eastbourne, Petone and Wainuiomata by Alison Carey and Wikipedia. Time Frame – 1930s.

Main Ridge Track Track
Geographical term in that it is the prominent ridge and that it is long and narrow. It was also known as the Summit / West Ridge Track. Summit is a geographical term named after in that it is high point. West Ridge is a geographical term that it is prominent ridge and that it is long and narrow, and it is in a westerly direction. The track has its origins in that it was also a Māori Track. At the Wainuiomata start of the track it is a former firebreak. The track starts from the top of the Wainuiomata Hill and goes along various ridges to the intersection of Kererū and Hawtrey Track located at Eastbourne.

Source – Map. Information – Internet Dictionary. Time Frame – 1960s.

Middle Ridge Track Track
Geographical term in that it is the middle of a long and narrow nearby series of ridges. The track starts from the toilet area at Butterfly Creek and goes to Mt Hawtrey.

Source – Map, Local Knowledge. Information – Internet Dictionary. Time Frame – 1960s.

Mitchell, Mt High Point
Thomas John Mitchell (1889 – 1969) came to Stokes Valley in 1897. He and his family owned a dairy farm at the entrance to Stokes Valley. He also supplied milk as part of the Mitchell Bros, Taitā, Hutt Valley.

Source – Map. Information – Electoral Roll. Time Frame – 1940s.

Moana Track Track
A body of open water like the ocean / sea. The track starts from 35 Moana Road and goes to the Kererū Track on the ridge behind Eastbourne.

Source – Map, Hutt City Tracks and Trails. Information – Māori Dictionary. Time Frame – 2000s.

Morepork Track Track
A owl which has large, staring eyes and a mournful cry. Mountain bike riders stopped on the track for a chat and there were 3 baby morepork chilling on a branch about 2 metres away. It is also known as Leightons Gully Track. The track starts from the Griffins Ridge Track and goes to the ECNZ Power Pylon Track on the ridge between the Hutt Valley and Wainuiomata. Also there is access from one of the gullys on the Lower Hutt Side of the Wainuiomata Hill Road going up.

Source – Map, Trailforks. Information – Internet Dictionary. Time Frame – 1840s.

Muritai Park Track Track
A sea breeze. Muri means breeze. Tai means sea. The track starts from between 261 and 263 Muritai Road and goes to the MacKenzie Track on the ridge between Eastbourne and Butterfly Creek.

Source – Map. Information – Māori Dictionary. Time Frame – 1930s.

ngahu.jpeg: 1174x492, 93k (2020 Jul 30 08:24)
Nga Hu and Nga Rerenga
from The Great Harbour Of Tara
by G. Leslie Adkin

Ngā Hū Personal Name
The sound. Named after a Māori woman who had a narrow escape from drowning. Ngā means the. Hū means sound.

Source – The Great Harbour Of Tara by G. Leslie Adkin. Information – The Great Harbour Of Tara by G. Leslie Adkin, The Land of Tara and they who settled it by Elsdon Best. Time Frame – 1800s.

Ngā Rerenga Personal Name
The flight. Named after a Māori woman who had a narrow escape from drowning. Ngā means the. Rerenga means flight.

Source – The Great Harbour Of Tara by G. Leslie Adkin. Information – The Great Harbour Of Tara by G. Leslie Adkin, The Land of Tara and they who settled it by Elsdon Best. Time Frame – 1800s.

Ngaumatau Road Track Track
A bite of the fish hook. Ngau means bite. Matau means fish hook. The shoreline was an area where the local Māori used it as a fishing place. The track starts from 67 Cheviot Road and goes to opposite 28 Ngaumatau Road. At the start of the track from Cheviot Road there are water pipes to the Point Howard Reservoir. Ngaumatau is also known as Point Howard.

Source – Map. Information – Māori Dictionary. Time Frame – 1930s.

Ngutu–ihe Pa Settlement
A beak of the garfish. Ngutu means beak. Ihe means garfish. It was a Māori settlement associated with the Ngāti-Ira tribal group. It was located on the north side of Tunnel Grove, Seaview, Hutt Valley. It is also a name of a high point along the Howard Road Track.

Source – The Great Harbour Of Tara by G. Leslie Adkin. Information – The Great Harbour Of Tara by G. Leslie Adkin. Time Frame – 1800s.

Okākaho Stream Water
A place of the flower culms / stalks of the toetoe. O means of. Kākaho means flower culms / stalks of the toetoe. Between the Pencarrow Coast Road / The Great Harbour Way / Te Aranui O Pōneke and the foot of the hill there is the remains of a Coastwatchers Hut built as part of World War 2 (1939 – 1945). The hut itself was in existence between 1940 and the early 1980s. There was also a Māori settlement located in the area that was associated with the Ngāti–Awa tribal group.

Source – Map. Information – The Great Harbour Of Tara by G. Leslie Adkin. Time Frame – 1800s.

Old Soil Bureau Track Track
The now defunct government organisation, the Department of Scientific and Industrial Research (DSIR) had a Soil Research Centre in the area. This was closed in the early 1990s. To a lesser extent it is also known as the Taitā College Track which is named after the school at 188 Eastern Hutt Road. It is a former firebreak / access track. The track starts from the vicinity of 180 Eastern Hutt Road and goes to Shaftesbury Grove Track on the ridge between Taitā, Hutt Valley and Stokes Valley.

Source – Map. Information – Māori Dictionary. Time Frame – 1960s.

Ōrua-Pounui Headland / Park
Belonging to Rua-Pouanui. Ō means of. Rua Pouanui is a name of a person. The Greater Wellington Regional Council owns the park and the area covered is about 295 hectares. They have owned the park since 2011. The main entrance is from about 1460 Coast Road. Other entrances are from Fitzroy Bay and the Wainuiomata Coast. There is a light house and related structures located at Ōrua–Pouanui. It is part of the East Harbour Regional Park. It was formerly known as Baring Head.

Source – Map. Information – The Great Harbour Of Tara by G. Leslie Adkin, Te Ika-a-Māui tangata whenua place names map index. Time Frame – 1800s.

Paiaka Stream Water
A root of a tree. It is also named after the ship SS Paiaka that came ashore in 1906. It is also known as Te Karaka Stream.

Source – Map. Information – The Great Harbour Of Tara by G. Leslie Adkin. Time Frame – 1800s.

Parangarahu Pa Settlement
Parangarahu Lakes Park / Ngā Roto O Parangarahu Water / Reserve / Park
The fern basket. Para means fern. Nga means the. Rahu means basket. It was a place where the people from the Māori settlement at Te Ātiawa, Petone visited seasonally and produced wheat among other things. It is the pa of Tautoki who was the younger brother of Tara. The pa was located on a spur above Fitzroy Bay. The settlement was located along the foreshore just south of where the road from the lighthouse meets the Pencarrow Coast Road. The settlement was abandoned by the 1850s. The area was Māori land and was associated with Te Tatau o te Pō Marae, who are the successor of Pito-one Pa.

Parangarahu Lakes Park / Ngā Roto O Parangarahu was also known as Pencarrow Lakes Park. Ngā means the. Roto means lake. O means of. Parangarahu meaning is stated above. The Greater Wellington Regional Council owns the park and the area covered is about 423 hectares.

The word Parangarahu has had a variety of spellings such as Parangarehu / Parangarau / Parangirau.

Source – Map, The Great Harbour Of Tara by G. Leslie Adkin. Information – The Great Harbour Of Tara by G. Leslie Adkin. Time Frame – 1800s.

Parāo-nui / Parāoa-nui Settlement
A large whale. Para means fish. O means of. Nui means large. It was also the site of a Māori settlement. To a lesser extent around the 1900s it was known as Pranui / Praunui Bay, which is a misspelling of Parāo–nui / Parāoa–nui.

Source – Map, The Great Harbour Of Tara by G. Leslie Adkin. Information – The Great Harbour Of Tara by G. Leslie Adkin. Time Frame – 1800s.

Pencarrow Coast Road Track
Pencarrow Head Headland
Pencarrow Lakes Water
A head of the valley or high fort. Pen means head top end or a promontory. Carrow means dweller at the foot of the hill. It is derived from a Cornish language word. It is from the Cornwall in the country of England residence of Sir William Molesworth (1810 – 1855) who was a director of the New Zealand Company. He was also a Member of Parliament in the country of England.

Pencarrow Head to a lesser extent was also known as Lighthouse Reserve, which is named after a tower or other structure containing a beacon light to warn or guide ships at sea. There are 2 lighthouses located here. It is also known as Te–Rae–akiaki.

Pencarrow Lakes is now known as the Parangarahu Lakes.

The Pencarrow Coast Road was built in the late 1950s from Burdans Gate to Pencarrow Head as part of the waste water outlet scheme. It was extended to Baring Head area in the early 1960s. It replaced an earlier track and has its origins in that it was also a Māori Track. It is also known as The Great Harbour Way / Te Aranui O Pōneke. It is a private road owned by the Hutt City Council.

Source – Map. Information – and Wikipedia. Time Frame – 1840s.

Pinehaven Ridge Track Track
The pine tree (sequoia) grows in the vicinity which began to be planted in 1926. Haven is a place or a feeling that makes you feel safe and comfortable. It is a former firebreak. The track starts from the intersection of Kingsley Street Track and Wheelers Way Track and goes to the intersection of Goodwin Drive Track and Kiln Street Track. It is on the ridge between the Silverstream Landfill and Pinehaven.

Source – Map, Trailforks. Information – Upper Hutt Street A–Z Master Themes by Lynly Yates. Time Frame – 1940s.

Pipes Bay Geographic Feature
Large concrete sewer pipes used to be stored here from the 1950s to the 2000s. It is also known as Big Gully Bay. It is a surf break area.

Source – Map. Information – The Pencarrow Walk – Eastbourne to Kohangatera by East Harbour Environmental Association. Time Frame – 1950s.

Pipe Track Track
A tube to carry fluid substances like water. It is where pipes from the Ōrongorongo River water intake scheme were laid going over the Wainuiomata Hill. To a lesser extent it was also known as the Tunnel Gully Track. This is named after the 1880s and 1930s water supply and service tunnels that goes under the Wainuiomata Hill to Waiū Street, Parkway, Wainuiomata that is located at 26 Tunnel Grove. The track started from Tunnel Grove, Gracefield, Lower Hutt and went over the Wainuiomata Hill to Waiū Street, Parkway, Wainuiomata. Only the Lower Hutt side of the track is there now. The Wainuiomata side of the track has mostly gone due to roadworks and being over grown by trees.

Source – Map. Information – Our Water History on Tap by John Morrison. Time Frame – 1920s.

Plantation Reserve Park / Reserve
A place where exotic trees like pine trees were grown and are still there. The reserve covered the area south of Mt Lowry to the north of Mt Hawtrey in the Days Bay vicinity. It is now part of the East Harbour Regional Park.

Source – Map. Information – Internet Dictionary. Time Frame – 1930s.

Quarry Bluff / Point Headland
A place where stones and other materials were extracted. There is the remains of a wharf here. It is also known as Hinds Point.

Source – Map, The Pencarrow Walk – Eastbourne to Kohangatera compiled and published by the East Harbour Environmental Association. Information – Internet Dictionary. Time Frame – 1900s.

Rangers Hut, Butterfly Creek Hut
The Eastbourne Forest Rangers is an organisation where volunteers are interested in the recreation and conservation aspects of the bush surrounding the Eastern Bays of the Wellington Harbour. To a lesser extent it also known as Green Hut as the colour of the hut is green. The private hut is located near the intersection of the Kōwhai Track and MacKenzie Street Track. The hut was built in the 1920s, and was rebuilt in 1950s and is still there.

Source – Local Knowledge. Information – Conversation with various peoples. Time Frame – 1940s.

Rātā Street Loop Track / Te Ara O Rātā Track
A tall native tree (Metrosideros robusta (Northern), Metrosideros umbellata (Southern)) that has red flowers similar to those of the pōhutukawa. It starts as a vine and eventually engulfs its host tree. These type of trees were in the area before it was logged by the Strand Brothers who were timber merchants based in the Hutt Valley from the 1900s to 1920s. It is also known as Te Ara O Rātā which is The Path of Rātā. Te means the. Ara means Path. O means of. Rātā is a type of tree species as stated previously. There is a water reservoir known as Rātā Street Reservoi that was built in 1971, and this is located near the entrance from the track that starts from 255 Rātā Street. The track starts from next to 239 Rātā Street and goes to 255 Rātā Street.

Source – Map. Information – Māori Dictionary. Time Frame – 1950s.

Raukawa Street Track Track
A native tree (Raukaua edgerleyi) with glossy, deep green leaves, a yellowish prominent midvein and paler olive-green underneath. It is used traditionally for scented oils. Such leaves were worn by Māori chiefs in mourning, and gave their name to the Raukawa tribal group. It was originally a farm track and there is the remains of a fenceline along the path. It was known also as Norrie Drive Track, which was named after Charles Willoughby Moke Norrie (1893 – 1977), who was the Governor General of New Zealand from 1952 to 1957. The track starts from next to 92 Raukawa Street and goes to the Stokes Valley Track on the ridge between Stokes Valley and Naenae, Hutt Valley.

Source – Map, Insight Stokes Valley. Information – Māori Dictionary. Time Frame – 1940s.

Rhodes Hill High Point
William Bernard Rhodes (1807 – 1878) was a 19th century leaseholder in Gollans Valley. He had cattle running in the area. It is now known as Mt Cameron.

Source – Map. Information – Electoral Roll. Time Frame – 1840s.

Scout Hut, Gollans Valley Hut
A organisation that caters to youth through adventurous experiences to lead lives that make a positive difference. It was also known as Whare O ParāoneBrowns Hut. Whare mean hut. O means of. Parāone means brown as in the colour. The hut was in existence from the 1920s to 1963. It was located on private land in the northern area of Gollans Valley near the Butterfly Creek picnic / rest area.

Source – Newspaper Article. Information – Internet Search. Time Frame – 1900s.

Shaftesbury Grove Track Track
Named after Shaftesbury Avenue in London, England. It is a access track to the Delaney Reservoir which was built in 1964. The track starts from 12 Shaftesbury Grove and goes to the water reservoir known as Delaney Reservoir located on the ridge between Taitā and Stokes Valley.

Source – Map. Information – Valley And Bays – Origins Of Street Names In Lower Hutt, including Eastbourne, Petone and Wainuiomata by Alison Carey. Time Frame – 1960s.

Shag Rock Geographic Feature
A native white and black cormorant / shag bird species. It is also known as Kōtuku Kawau.

Source – Map, Greater Wellington Regional Council. Information – Internet Dictionary. Time Frame – 1990s.

Snake, Mt High Point
A Snake Feather is a species of flowering plant which is native to tropical West Africa from Nigeria east to the Congo. It is regarded as a weed in New Zealand.

Source – Map. Information – Wikipedia. Time Frame – 1960s.

Stan Hunts Hut, Butterfly Creek Hut
Stanley Alfred Hunt (1929 – 2019) was associated with the Eastbourne Forest Rangers and was a volunteer with other organisations. The private hut was built in the 1970s along the Middle Ridge Track and is still there.

Source – Local Knowledge. Information – Internet Search. Time Frame – 1970s.

Stewart, Mt High Point
Allan William Stewart (1928 – 2007) was a engineer, civil surveyor who worked for the Hutt County Council in the 1960s and 1970s.

Source – Map. Information – Hutt County Council Centenary 1877 – 1977 by James M Daley. Time Frame – 1960s.

Stokes, Mt High Point
Stokes Valley Stream Water
Stokes Valley Track Track
Robert Stokes (1809 – 1880) was a surveyor for the New Zealand Company. He later entered into business. He was also represented on various political bodies.

The Stokes Valley Track starts from 574 Stokes Valley Road and goes to the ridge between Stokes Valley and Naenae, Hutt Valley. It was also known as Top Bush Track, which is named after that there are trees located in this area at the head of Stokes Valley.

Source – Hutt City Tracks and Trails. Information – Hutt County Council Centenary 1877 – 1977 by James M Daley and Wikipedia. Time Frame – 1960s.

Summit Road Firebreak Track Track
Geographical term in that a road runs along the spur of the hill towards the summit. There is a water reservoir known as Naenae Reservoir at the start of the track and this was built in 1946. There are 2 firefighting ponds along with a small flat area for a landing pad for helicopters about halfway along the track, which was constructed in 1994. The track starts from 37 Summit Road, Fairfield and goes to the ECNZ Power Pylon Road on the ridge between the Hutt Valley and Wainuiomata.

Source – Map. Information – Valley And Bays – Origins Of Street Names In Lower Hutt, including Eastbourne, Petone and Wainuiomata by Alison Carey. Time Frame – 1960s.

Swainson Stake High Point
William John Swainson (1789 – 1855) was a ornithologist, malacologist, conchologist, entomologist and a artist. He lived in the Hutt Valley. It is located near Mt Cameron.

Source – Map. Information – Wikipedia. Time Frame – 1880s.

Sykes Hill High Point
George Sykes (1815 – 1873) was a 19th century settler at Waiwhetu, Hutt Valley. It is located in the Stokes Valley area.

Source – Map. Information – Electoral Roll. Time Frame – 1870s.

Taitā Lawn Cemetery Track Track
Taitā Reservoir Track Track
Taitā is a accumulation of logs or driftwood. This occurred in the Taitā Gorge area where logs that came down in floods accumulated in a certain area.

The Taitā Lawn Cemetery Tracks starts from the end of New Monumental Lawn at Taitā Cemetery and goes to the Stokes Valley Ridge Track between Naenae and Stokes Valley.

The Taitā Reservoir Track starts from 178 Eastern Hutt Road and goes to the Stokes Valley Ridge Track between Stokes Valley and Taitā. The water reservoir was built in 1963. It is a access track.

Source – Hutt City Tracks and Trails. Information – Māori Dictionary. Time Frame – 1960s.

Takapau–rangi Settlement
A flat sleeping mat where there is sky. Takapau means flat sleeping mat. Rangi means sky. It was a inland temporary settlement for the people of the Parangarahu settlement. It located at the northern end of Lake Kohangatera. It was abandoned by the 1850s.

Source – The Great Harbour Of Tara by G. Leslie Adkin. Information – The Great Harbour Of Tara by G. Leslie Adkin. Time Frame – 1800s.

Tawhai Street Track Track
A native tree that has roundish small alternating leaves which have rounded double teeth. It is also known as the silver beech. It is a former farm track. The track starts from 94 Tawhai Street and goes to the ridge between Stokes Valley and Whitemans Valley.

Source – Map, Hutt City Tracks and Trails. Information – Māori Dictionary. Time Frame – 1970s.

TCI Firebreak Track
TCI (Technical Correspondence Institute) offered mainly theory training in trades subjects. In 1990 the organisation was renamed to The Open Polytechnic of New Zealand. The firebreak is mostly overgrown now. The firebreak started from the vicinity of 3 Clearly Street, Hutt Valley and went to the ECNZ Power Pylon Track on the ridge between the Hutt Valley and Wainuiomata. The firebreak became mostly overgrown from 2015.

Source – Map, Hutt City Tracks and Trails. Information – Internet Search. Time Frame – 1960s.

Te Anakōpiro Cave
The cave is steep in water. Te means the. Ana means cave. Kōpiro means steep in water.

Source – The Great Harbour Of Tara by G. Leslie Adkin. Information – The Great Harbour Of Tara by G. Leslie Adkin. Time Frame – 1800s.

Te Aranui O Pōneke Road / Track
The great path of Port Nicholson. Te means the. Ara means path. Nui means great. O means of. Pōneke is a Maori phonetic transliteration of Port Nick which is short for Port Nicholson – one of the names for Wellington Harbour. It is also known as The Great Harbour Way / Pencarrow Coast Road. It is a private road owned by the Hutt City Council.

Source – Map. Information – Maori Dictionary. Time Frame – 2010s.

Te Karaka Stream Water
The native tree (Corynocarpus laevigatus) that has glossy leaves and orange berries. Te means the. Karaka means to be orange. It is also known as Paiaka Stream.

Source – Map, Eastbourne: A History Of The Eastern Bays by Ann Beaglehole. Information – Māori Dictionary. Time Frame – 1800s.

Te Koromiko Settlement
The native bushy shrub (Hebe elliptica) that has narrow pointed leaves up to 4 meters tall, but often less. Te means the. Koromiko is a native shrub with small, thick, folded leaves in four neat rows, white flower. It was also the site of a Māori settlement.

Source – The Great Harbour Of Tara by G. Leslie Adkin. Information – Māori Dictionary. Time Frame – 1800s.

Te Rae–akiaki Headland
The headland where the sea dashes up or pounds. Te means the. Rae means headland. Akiaki means dash. It is also known as Pencarrow Head.

Source – Map, The Great Harbour Of Tara by G. Leslie Adkin. Information – The Great Harbour Of Tara by G. Leslie Adkin. Time Frame – 1800s.

Te Rae–O-Pāua Headland
The promontory or coastal headland of Pāua. Te means the. Rae means headland. O means of. Pāua means shellfish. It may also may be a corruption of Poua which would link this with the vernacular name of Baring Head / Ōrua–Pouanui.

Source – The Great Harbour Of Tara by G. Leslie Adkin. Information – The Great Harbour Of Tara by G. Leslie Adkin. Time Frame – 1800s.

Te Wera Personal Name
The hot. Te means the. Wera means hot. Bears the name of a warrior of the Māori Ngāti–Mutunga tribal group, slain there by Te Retimana Te Korou (1780s – 1882) a war prisoner from the Wairarapa in about 1834. There is a very prominent rock with an overhang here.

Source – The Great Harbour Of Tara by G. Leslie Adkin. Information – The Great Harbour Of Tara by G. Leslie Adkin. Time Frame – 1800s.

Te Whiti Firebreak Track Track
Te Whiti Riser Track Track
Te Whiti O Rongomai (1830 – 1907) was a Māori Te Āti Awa prophet of Parihaka, Taranaki. It was named by Īhāia Pōrutu Puketapu (1887 – 1971), a Māori elder of the Waiwhetū Marae, Hutt Valley.

Te Whiti Firebreak Track starts from along the hillside at Te Whiti Park which is located at 170 Whites Line East or opposite 197 Riverside Drive. It goes to the top of the ridge between the Hutt Valley and Wainuiomata.

Te Whiti Riser Track starts from along the hillside at Te Whiti Park which is located at 170 Whites Line East or opposite 197 Riverside Drive. It goes to the intersection of the Summit Road Firebreak Track and ECNZ Power Pylon Road on the ridge between the Hutt Valley and Wainuiomata.

Source – Map. Information – Wikipedia. Time Frame – 2016.

Trig Gully High Point
A reference point on high ground used in surveying, typically marked by a small pillar. It is located along the hill side between Stokes Valley and the Silverstream Landfill.

Source – Map. Information – Internet Search. Time Frame – 1910s.

Tunnel Grove Firebreak Track Track
Tunnel Grove Track Track
A artificial underground passage built through a hill. It refers to the 1880s and 1930s water supply and service tunnels that goes under the Wainuiomata Hill to Waiū Street, Parkway, Wainuiomata that is located at 26 Tunnel Grove.

The Tunnel Grove Firebreak Track starts at 25 Tunnel Grove and goes to the viewpoint at the top of the Wainuiomata Hill Road. It was built to service the power lines. At times the track is overgrown.

The Tunnel Grove Track starts at 25 Tunnel Grove and goes to the transmission tower number 32 that takes the power from Haywards, Hutt Valley along the eastern hills to Gracefield, Hutt Valley.

Source – Map. Information – Internet Search. Time Frame – 1960s.

Valley View Hill High Point
Geographical term in that there is a long, narrow region of low land between hills ranges and that there is a view from the top.

Source – Map. Information – Internet Dictionary. Time Frame – 1880s.

Waddington Winder Track
Elizabeth Waddington later Spotswood (1809 – 1851). She was Richard John Seddon (1845 – 1906) wife Louisa Jane Spotswood (1851 – 1903) grandmother. Richard was the Liberal Party Prime Minister of New Zealand from 1893 to 1906. In the Waddington Drive, Naenae area there was going to be suburbia in the 1900s but this did not happen until the 1940s. The track starts from between 46 and 50 Waddington Drive, Naenae and goes to the intersection of the Summit Road Firebreak Track and ECNZ Power Pylon Road on the ridge between the Hutt Valley and Wainuiomata.

Source – Trailforks. Information – Valley And Bays – Origins Of Street Names In Lower Hutt, including Eastbourne, Petone and Wainuiomata by Alison Carey. Time Frame – 2018.

Waimikomiko Stream Water
A stream where lots of young nīkau reside. Wai means stream. Miko means young nīkau shoot. It is also known as Cameron Stream.

Source – Map, The Great Harbour Of Tara by G. Leslie Adkin. Information – Māori Place Names Dictionary. Time Frame – 1800s.

Waiwhetū, Mt High Point
Waiwhetū Stream Water
Starry Water. Wai means water. Whetū means stars. It was also known as Waiwetū, which is a pre 1920s alternative spelling of Waiwhetū. To lesser extent in the 1850s / 1860s it was known as Wairetu which is a alternative spelling of Waiwhetū.

Source – Map. Information – Māori Place Names Dictionary. Time Frame – 1800s.

Wet Jandle Track Track
A slang term in that the track is difficult. The track is about halfway along the Summit Road Firebreak Track.

Source – Map,Trailforks. Information – Internet Dictionary. Time Frame – 2000s.

Wheelers Way Track Track
Allen Henry Wheeler (1903 – 1984) was a Royal Air Force officer and pilot who served during World War Two (1939 - 1945) in England. He lived in England. Aircraft themes were used for naming in the Blue Mountains, Upper Hutt subdivision. The track is a former firebreak. The track starts from the intersection of the Kingsley Street Track and Pinehaven Ridge Track and goes to the end of Avro Road, Blue Mountains, Upper Hutt.

Source – Map, Trailforks. Information – Upper Hutt Street A–Z Master Themes by Lynly Yates and Wikipedia. Time Frame – 1950s.

Wilkie Crescent Firebreak Track Track
George Wilkie (1797 – 1865) was a 19th century settler in the Hutt Valley. The track starts from 33 Wilkie Crescent, Naenae and goes to the ridge between the Hutt Valley and Upper Moores Valley, Wainuiomata. The firebreak became partly overgrown from 2015. There is a firefighting pond along with a small flat area about halfway along the track, which was constructed in 1994.

Source – Map, Hutt City Tracks and Trails. Information – Valley And Bays – Origins Of Street Names In Lower Hutt, including Eastbourne, Petone and Wainuiomata by Alison Carey. Time Frame – 1960s.

Wingate Firebreak Track Track
Orde Charles Wingate (1903 – 1944) was a British general and originator of the Chindit force officially known as Long Range Penetration Group, who were special operations units of the British and Indian armies. This force fought behind Japanese lines in the country of Burma which is now known as Myanmar during World War 2 (1939 – 1945). It was where the rubbish refuse / tip area was located between the 1956 and 1997 in various forms. The firebreak became partly overgrown from the year 2000. The track starts from 7 Page Grove, Wingate and goes to the ridge between the Hutt and Stokes Valleys.

Source – Map, Hutt City Tracks and Trails. Information – Valley And Bays – Origins Of Street Names In Lower Hutt, including Eastbourne, Petone and Wainuiomata by Alison Carey. Time Frame – 1960s.

Wry Hill High Point
The origin the name is not known. However it is possible that is named after these reasons: shorten version of Lowry; secluded nook or corner of land; funny in a understated, sarcastic, or ironic way; a face that is twisted in an expression of distaste or displeasure.

Source – Map. Information – ?? Time Frame – 1870s.

Bibliography

Maps

  • Hutt N160 1943.
  • Hutt N160 3rd Edition 1965.
  • Hutt N160 4th Edition 1977.
  • Lower Hutt BQ32 Edition 1 2009.
  • Lower Hutt BQ32 Edition 1 2017.
  • Turakirae R28 Edition 1 1978.
  • Wellington BQ31 Edition 2 2016.
  • Wellington N164 2nd Edition 1962.
  • Wellington N164 3rd Edition 1967.
  • Wellington N164 4th Edition 1974.
  • Wellington R27 1st Edition 1979.
  • Wellington R27 and part Q27 2nd Edition 1983.
  • Wellington R27, R28 and part Q27 3rd Edition 1996.
  • Wellington R27, R28 and part Q27 2006.

Surveyor Field Books from Land Information New Zealand.

Other Sources

Birth and Deaths dates have been obtained from:

  • Birth, Death and Marriage Indexes from New Zealand, England and Ireland.
  • Other genealogy sources such as Ancestry and Find My Past.
Other:
  • All Trails website.
  • Department of Conservation (DOC) website.
  • Eastbourne Herald.
  • Eastbourne Tracks and Trails Brochures.
  • Friends of the Waiwhetu's Haywards Scenic Reserve website.
  • Greater Wellington Regional Council (GRWC) website.
  • Hutt Valley Tracks and Trails Brochures.
  • Internet Dictionary.
  • Internet Searches.
  • Local Knowledge.
  • Maps Past New Zealand website.
  • New Zealand Electoral Rolls from the 1860s to present.
  • Papers Past website.
  • Petone Settlers Data(approve sites).
  • Port Nicholson Block Settlement Trust.
  • Stokes Valley History Facebook web page.
  • Tararua Tramping Club Trip reports and website.
  • Trailforks website.
  • Tupoki Takarangi Trust.
  • Wainuiomata Trail Project website.
  • Wikipedia.

Books / Documents

  • Adkin, G. Leslie. The Great Harbour of Tara.
  • Bagnall, A. G. Okiwi – European Occupation of the Eastern Bays, Port Nicholson.
  • Beaglehole, Ann. Eastbourne: A History Of The Eastern Bays.
  • Beale, P and Hitchens, F. 'Petone to Pencarrow – A Shoreline with a History.
  • Best, Elsdon. The Land of Tara, and they who settled it(approve sites), The Story of the Occupation of Te Whanga-nui-a-Tara (the Great Harbour of Tara), or Port Nicholson, by the Maoris.
  • Carey, Alison. Valley And Bays – Origins of Street Names in Lower Hutt, including Eastbourne, Petone and Wainuiomata.
  • Cochran, Chris and Maclean, Chris and Sheppard, Allan. Built Heritage of the Orongorongo Valley.
  • Daley, James M. Hutt County Council Centenary 1877 – 1977.
  • Eastbourne Forest Rangers. Butterfly Creek – A Visitors Guide to the Forests between Eastbourne and Wainuiomata.
  • East Harbour Environmental Association. The Pencarrow Walk – Eastbourne to Kohangatera.
  • Foley, Kristen. Wellington Rock – A Guide for Climbers.
  • Gunson. Michael, Orchard, Shane and Windsor, Peter. Identification of Wellington Regional Surfbreaks.
  • Hydrographic Office. New Zealand Pilot including Kermadec Island, Chatham Island and the Off Lying Islands South East and South West.
  • Kenneally, J. M. and B. M. Wainuiomata These Passing Years.
  • Kerr, Ross. A Chronology of the Tararua and Rimutaka Ranges – 6th Edition.
  • May, Lloyd. Rata Street School 50th Jubilee 2000.
  • Morrison, John. Our Water History on Tap.
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  • Reed, A.W. A Dictionary of Māori Place Names.
  • Smith, N. L. Stokes Valley 1840 – 1965.
  • Stokes Valley Jaycee. Insight Stokes Valley.
  • Wallace, Gavin and Chambers, Dawn. Tales From Wainuiomata's Past Volume 2.
  • Wallace, Gavin. The Land Barons Of Wainuiomata.
  • Wallace, Gavin (compiled). Tales From Wainuiomata's Past.
  • Watts, Milton and Poppy. Stokes Valley Through The Years.
  • Yaldwyn, Flora. A History of Point Howard and Lowry Bay.
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  • Yates, Lynly. Upper Hutt District and Topographical Features.
Category
Hutt Valley Glossary

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